Resources

Links and file downloads to the curriculum, reports raw data and collections of resources assembled for your needs.

Sikh History: Getting to Know Hari Singh Nalua

Hari Singh Nalua (popularly ‘Nalwa’ or ‘Nalva’) (1791-1837), was one of the greatest generals of his time. Even though the contributions of Hari Singh Nalua are well recorded in the annals of history, he is often not celebrated or brought to the forefront of Sikh knowledge. As a general, he exhibited exemplary leadership qualities and military skills that helped Sikhs strengthen and consolidate their military and political position in South Asia. Today, not many people know of his contribution to the Sikh position and rule during the time.

Explore the life and lessons of Hari Singh Nalua and his legacy through our downloadable curriculum, as well as through our originally produced podcast and video series 'Sikh History'.

Suggested Reading List

In an effort to make learning more about Sikhi and engaging process, our research staff compiles scholarly articles from around the web and other academic resources.

Sikhi & Sexuality – Raw Data

This is a download of the raw source data that was generated for the State of the Panth report "Sikhi & Sexuality".

A global survey, included in the report, was presented to 1,212 self- identified Sikhs from 31 countries. The purpose of this survey was to gain insight into Sikh thoughts and feelings surrounding sexuality today.

Overall, responses outlined a clear understanding that lust and sex are not synonymous — importantly, neither are sex and sexuality. There was also a clear consensus that Sikh institutions must play some role in providing nonjudgmental support and resources to Sikhs of all gender identities and sexual orientations.

Sikhi & Sexuality – Report

This is the full, downloadable PDF of the the State of the Panth report "Sikhi & Sexuality".

The focus of this report is to understand sexuality in the context of a Sikh worldview, from a Gurmat (Guru’s Way) perspective, as inferred from Bani (wisdom), Tavarikh (history), and Rahit (lifestyle).

This report presents recommendations based on the Gurmat components on both the individual and institutional levels. Bani, Tavarikh, and Rahit offer guidance to individuals on their journeys in understanding their sexuality, encouraging them to seek guidance from the Guru Granth Sahib, support from their peers, and to develop a personal relationship with IkOankar.

Sikhi & Abortion – Raw Data

This is a download of the raw source data that was generated for the State of the Panth report "Sikhi & Abortion".

A global survey, included in the report, was presented to 1,277 self-identified Sikhs from 28 different countries, asking them to consider the issue of abortion and common questions related to the topic. The purpose of this survey was to understand what informs individual opinions, thoughts, and feelings related to abortion.

Overall, the responses outlined that members of the global Sikh Panth take into account Sikhi, science, and personal life experience when forming opinions about the issue of abortion. The responses also outlined how closely related sex-selection and abortion are in the Panjabi and South Asian contexts. Although Gurmat considers the act of consensual conception to be a Divine act, the majority of respondents believe life begins at some time after conception, and that health issues are the number one reason that women seek abortions. The survey responses highlighted a clear belief that Sikh institutions should play some role in providing support and resources for those considering abortion, but that ultimately the decision is the individual’s alone.

Sikhi & Abortion – Report

This is the full, downloadable PDF of the the State of the Panth report "Sikhi & Abortion".

The focus of this report is to gain insight into Sikh thoughts and feelings surrounding the issue of abortion today, and understand abortion in the context of a Sikh worldview, from a Gurmat (Guru’s Way) perspective, as inferred from Bani (wisdom), Tavarikh (history), and Rahit (lifestyle). In situating the topic of abortion within a Gurmat framework, individuals can be reassured that making the choice to undergo the procedure does not condemn them to punishment and judgment. Institutions can work to come together for a more nuanced understanding, an empathetic response, and the ultimate goal of working towards a judgment-free Panth.

Getting To Know Guru Nanak Sahib E-Book

Sikh Research Institute (SikhRI) has published a new unit in the Gurmat Educational Resource for children titled Getting To Know Guru Nanak Sahib.

This set of lessons is meant to introduce children to Guru Nanak Sahib and help them develop a fundamental knowledge base through Sakhis and other activities. Getting To Know Guru Nanak Sahib is perfect for use at home, Gurmat and Panjabi schools, as well as Sikh camps.

I am looking forward to engaging my own two sons with this educational unit. This is a great way to commemorate Nanakshahi 550 and deepen our relationship with Guru Nanak Sahib as a family.
— Pritpal Singh, SikhRI Board of Directors

Included in the lessons are audio stories on Guru Nanak Sahib’s life recorded in both English and Panjabi in celebration of Guru Nanak Sahib’s 550th Prakash Purab.

The lesson plans provide questions to open up a dialog with the children and activities to give them an opportunity for self-exploration and self-reflection. There are nine lesson plans in the packet overall, and each one can be used individually or in combination with others.

Akal Takht Sahib: Timeless Sovereign Throne – Raw Data

This is a download of the raw source data that was generated for the State of the Panth report "Akal Takht Sahib: Timeless Sovereign Throne".

Sikh Research Institute has conducted a survey of 1,237 self-identified Sikhs from 27 different countries. The purpose of the survey was to gain insight into how Sikhs perceive the role of the Akal Takht Sahib in their own lives and in the lives of other Sikhs around the world. Responses outlined a clear engagement with the institution of Akal Takht Sahib, showing clear ideals of what the role and function of Akal Takht Sahib should be. The responses communicated a loss of faith in the governance of Akal Takht Sahib and a call for efforts towards a transparent, independent, representative, and active institution.

Akal Takht Sahib: Timeless Sovereign Throne – Report

This is the full, downloadable PDF of the the State of the Panth report "Akal Takht Sahib: Timeless Sovereign Throne".

The focus of this report is to understand the role and function of Akal Takht Sahib from the Gurmat (Guru’s Way) perspective, as inferred from Bani (wisdom), Tavarikh (history), and Rahit (lifestyle). In understanding the Gurmat explanation of the function and role of Akal Takht Sahib, individuals and institutions can come together to push for a more transparent, independent, representative, and active institution.

This report makes recommendations based on Gurmat (the Guru’s Way) as inferred from Bani (wisdom), Tavarikh (history), and Rahit(lifestyle) that can be used by individuals and institutions to move towards Akal Takht Sahib remaining a central institution to the SikhPanth (Sikh collective).

Gurduara: A Sikh Place of Learning – Raw Data

This is a download of the raw source data that was generated for the State of the Panth report "Gurduara: A Sikh Place of Learning".

A survey of 1,172 self-identified Sikhs from 22 different countries was conducted by the Sikh Research Institute. It captures the views and aspirations of Sikhs about the role of Gurduaras within their local communities. The results included emphasis on investment in education based on Sikh principles, funding for community outreach projects, and empowerment of the Sikh youth. The Miri-Piri doctrine was not evident in the responses to how the Gurduara is defined, highlighting the changing role of the Gurduara in the lives of the Sikh community in the 21st century.

Gurduara: A Sikh Place of Learning – Report

This is the full, downloadable PDF of the the State of the Panth report "Gurduara: A Sikh Place of Learning".

What’s the relationship between the Gurduara governance and the local sangat worldwide? We traced Gurduara’s history throughout the ages and surveyed the opinions of 1,172 self-identified Sikhs from 22 countries.

The focus of this report is to understand the role of the local Gurduara within Sikh communities from the Gurmat (Guru’s Way) perspective, as inferred from Bani (wisdom), Tavarikh (history), and Rahit (lifestyle). In understanding the Gurmat explanation of the function of the Gurduara, local governance teams and Sikh sangat (community) can come together to create a Gurduara that is a cohesive community-focused place of learning.

Seva – Gurmat Educational Unit

The unit, packed with exciting lessons, will take students on a journey of exploration of the concept of Seva in light of Gurbani–Wisdom, Tavarikh–History, and Rahit–Lifestyle. SikhRI’s Seva lessons are created to be used equally at home, Sikh camps, or Gurmat and Panjabi schools.

The Seva educational unit consists of five lessons and can be taught to children of five years and above, providing them with a deeper understanding of the Divine. Families beginning their Seva journey can involve their neighbors and even a larger community along the way.

Gurmat and Panjabi schools can also use the educational unit to look at Seva as something beyond the internal community and showcase the “sevadars amongst them.”

Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage – Raw Data

This is a download of the raw source data that was generated for the State of the Panth report "Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage".

The survey highlights the discrepancies apparent within the Sikh population as of 2017. It suggests that organizations cannot remain passive to such community issues.

A survey of 948 self-identified Sikhs from 20 different countries was conducted to summarize the 2017 Sikh population’s understanding of the rights to participate in the Anand Karaj ceremony. The survey showed distinct divides in terms of who may be able to participatespecifically in the Sikh context of marriage. The survey also highlights the discrepancies apparent within the community as well as identifies where institutional educational efforts can be focused.

Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage – Report

This is the full, downloadable PDF of the the State of the Panth report "Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage".

Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage, the second report in the State of the Panth series. In exploring the division that exists in our community, we surveyed 1,000 self-identifying Sikhs across the globe. And the results might surprise you.

The focus of this report is to understand the Gurmat (the Guru’s Way) components of the Anand Karaj, as inferred from Bani (wisdom), Tavarikh (history), and Rahit (lifestyle). The principles expressed throughout the lava (interlinks) has a multidimensional meaning. There is a worldly literal description of the union between a husband and wife but also a metaphorical, genderless understanding of the human condition which would transcend across all sexual orientations and/or genders.

Who is a Sikh? – Raw Data

This is a download of the raw source data that was generated for the State of the Panth report "Who is a Sikh?"

A survey of 938 individuals was conducted to summarize the 2017 Sikh population’s understanding of who a Sikh is. The survey results show significant differences between responses in comparison of age group and gender identity. The survey results mirror the concept of different groups within the Sikh community having varying understandings of how a Sikh should be defined.

This study makes recommendations on a personal and institutional level that can be implemented within the community from a holistic understanding of who a Sikh is.

Who is a Sikh? – Report

This is the full, downloadable PDF of the the State of the Panth report "Who is a Sikh?"

As the global Sikh population expands in size and complexion, the definition of a Sikh becomes increasingly important to support and shape the community. This study sets out to establish an understanding of how to conceptualize who is a Sikh.

Originally only two terms were used within the community: Sikh and Khalsa. From the original terms, some terms have been created for legal and social accountability while others reduce an individual’s sense of accountability or ownership. Various terminology used today has become intertwined with a sense of “hierarchy” or a scale of religiosity that was not always part of the tradition.

June 1984 Poster

Ik Oankar & Khanda Brochure

This digital download is a brochure expanding on symbols that are central to the Sikh experience:

Ik Oankar

Ik” is “One” and “Oankar” is “Creator”
Ik Oankar constitutes a part of Mul Mantar, the opening verse of the Guru Granth Sahib that states various qualities of Vahiguru, the Divine Being. Guru Nanak Sahib, the founder of Sikhi (also Sikhism), postulates the principle of One Force through this unique descriptive. This force is not an exclusive Sikh Divinity, but one that is common to all life and embraces all of creation.

Khanda

Khanda emblem typically adorns Nishan Sahib – the sikh flag, and it captures the entire Sikh worldview. The symbol is made up of four weapons which were used in early Sikh history. A steel ring called quoit, forms the center of the design and a double-edged sword, also called Khanda, sits upon it. The quoit is then accompanied by two swords, one on each side.

The quoit, known as Chakkar, represents an all embracing Divine Being that encompasses and pervades everything; supreme, perfect, timeless and boundless. Thus, the Chakkar is a symbol of Divine immorality and oneness of the creation. This is why Sikhs cherish the timeless message of dignity and freedom for all people regardless of their background or identity.

With special thanks to Virk, LLC, of Albany, Oregon.

Sikh Heritage Posters

These posters present Sikhs in the Panjab and the Diaspora, the institution of the Gurduara, and the impact Sikhs have had on global society and culture through their unique lifestyle and belief system.

Sojhi: Getting to Know Guru Granth Sahib

The Sojhi Summer Curriculum is dedicated to learning the history and profound wisdoms of Guru Granth Sahib Ji. The curriculum is designed for students between the ages of 7-15, to provide a greater understanding of Guru Granth Sahib Ji. This comprehensive resource is easily accessible for use at schools, camps and for families wanting to support their children's summer learning experience at home. Each lesson plan has been thoughtfully constructed to encourage, engage and strengthen the curious minds of future generations, by offering resources inspired by the teachings of Guru Granth Sahib Ji.

Sojhi: Grade 6 to 8 Curriculum

For Grade 6 to Grade 8 — this curriculum is developed and reviewed extensively by educators, child development specialists, and experts and scholars in the subject matter covered by the curriculum and it is widely used in Gurmat and Panjabi schools across North America, parts of Europe and Asia.

Special thanks to developers and reviewers: Jasmine Kaur, Harliv Kaur, Harinder Singh, Inderpreet Singh, Simran Jeet Singh, Harpreet Singh, Isha Kaur Singh, Navjot Singh, Carol Wright-Smith and Tejwant Kaur Chana.


Sojhi: Grade 3 to 5 Curriculum

For Grade 3 to Grade 5 — this curriculum is developed and reviewed extensively by educators, child development specialists, and experts and scholars in the subject matter covered by the curriculum and it is widely used in Gurmat and Panjabi schools across North America, parts of Europe and Asia.

Special thanks to developers and reviewers: Jasmine Kaur, Harliv Kaur, Harinder Singh, Inderpreet Singh, Simran Jeet Singh, Harpreet Singh, Isha Kaur Singh, Navjot Singh, Carol Wright-Smith and Tejwant Kaur Chana.

Sojhi: Kindergarten to Grade 2 Curriculum

For Kindergarten to Grade 2 — this curriculum is developed and reviewed extensively by educators, child development specialists, and experts and scholars in the subject matter covered by the curriculum and it is widely used in Gurmat and Panjabi schools across North America, parts of Europe and Asia.

Special thanks to developers and reviewers: Jasmine Kaur, Harliv Kaur, Harinder Singh, Inderpreet Singh, Simran Jeet Singh, Harpreet Singh, Isha Kaur Singh, Navjot Singh, Carol Wright-Smith and Tejwant Kaur Chana.