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Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage

State of the Panth – Report 2

Monday
,
5
February
2018

Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage

State of the Panth – Report 2

Monday
,
5
February
2018
State of the Panth
Sikhism

Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage

State of the Panth – Report 2

Monday
,
5
February
2018
State of the Panth
Sikhism
The Anand Karaj (Sikh marriage ceremony) is one of the life stages outlined with specific sentiments and ceremonies for Sikhs. Its procedures have received increased attention in recent years as a major community issue. These discussions revolve mainly around the right to participate, where inter-caste, inter-race, and sexuality fit into the ceremony.

The focus of this report is to understand the Gurmat (the Guru’s Way) components of the Anand Karaj, as inferred from Bani (wisdom), Tavarikh (history), and Rahit (lifestyle). The principles expressed throughout the lava (interlinks) has a multidimensional meaning. There is a worldly literal description of the union between a husband and wife but also a metaphorical, genderless understanding of the human condition which would transcend across all sexual orientations and/or genders.

A global survey, included in the report, presented nearly 1,000 self- identified Sikhs with questions related to the rights to participate in the  Anand Karaj ceremony. The survey highlights the discrepancies apparent within the Sikh population as of 2017. It suggests that organizations cannot remain passive to such community issues.

This study presents recommendations based on the Gurmat components on a personal and institutional level as a way to better understand, implement, and proceed with the Anand Karaj ceremony. Organizations need to take a more active role in engaging with a changing Sikh population, whether that be in addressing inter-faith marriages or same-sex couple marriages. On an individual level, Sikhs are prompted to reflect on why they are undergoing a Sikh marriage ceremony. The ultimate focus on the Anand Karaj is one’s commitment to Guru Granth Sahib and a desire to live a life as outlined by Guru Sahib.

It is found that the Sikh marriage ceremony of Anand Karaj is a unique initiation into married life for Sikhs. The Anand Karaj highlights the ideal life trajectory or model for one’s path in life as a Sikh. Those who wish and choose to abide by the Sikh paradigm and Gurmat lifestyle join a historical tradition that was built on Oneness, spirituality, and simplicity.

The Anand Karaj (literally, “blissful act”), the Sikh marriage ceremony, is one of the major life events a Sikh may undergo. The Anand Karaj itself consists of four lava (interlinks) in the presence of Guru Granth Sahib. The lava, popularly transliterated as lavaan or lavan, come as lav or the plural lava in Guru Granth Sahib. These lava make up the main aspect of the Anand Karaj. A variety of cultural practices tend to be included throughout the wedding festivities in Sikh families. The focus of this work is to discuss solely the Anand Karaj ceremony and is less related to other events or practices seen throughout weddings.

In recent times, the Anand Karaj has come to the forefront of community issues in regards to the right to participate in the ceremony, specifically where inter-caste, inter-race, and sexuality come into play.

A survey of 948 self-identified Sikhs from 20 different countries was conducted to summarize the 2017 Sikh population’s understanding of the rights to participate in the Anand Karaj ceremony. The survey showed distinct divides in terms of who may be able to participate specifically in the Sikh context of marriage. The survey also highlights the discrepancies apparent within the community as well as identifies where institutional educational efforts can be focused.

This study makes recommendations on a personal and institutional level that can be used by individuals and organizations to better understand, implement, and proceed with the Anand Karaj ceremony.

The focus of this report is to understand the Gurmat (the Guru’s Way) components of the Anand Karaj, as inferred from Bani (wisdom), Tavarikh (history), and Rahit (lifestyle).

Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage – Report

This is the full, downloadable PDF of the the State of the Panth report "Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage".

Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage, the second report in the State of the Panth series. In exploring the division that exists in our community, we surveyed 1,000 self-identifying Sikhs across the globe. And the results might surprise you.

The focus of this report is to understand the Gurmat (the Guru’s Way) components of the Anand Karaj, as inferred from Bani (wisdom), Tavarikh (history), and Rahit (lifestyle). The principles expressed throughout the lava (interlinks) has a multidimensional meaning. There is a worldly literal description of the union between a husband and wife but also a metaphorical, genderless understanding of the human condition which would transcend across all sexual orientations and/or genders.

DownloadView

Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage – Raw Data

This is a download of the raw source data that was generated for the State of the Panth report "Anand Karaj: The Sikh Marriage".

The survey highlights the discrepancies apparent within the Sikh population as of 2017. It suggests that organizations cannot remain passive to such community issues.

A survey of 948 self-identified Sikhs from 20 different countries was conducted to summarize the 2017 Sikh population’s understanding of the rights to participate in the Anand Karaj ceremony. The survey showed distinct divides in terms of who may be able to participatespecifically in the Sikh context of marriage. The survey also highlights the discrepancies apparent within the community as well as identifies where institutional educational efforts can be focused.

DownloadView
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Written By

Senior Fellow, Research & Policy

Harinder Singh is the Senior Fellow at the Sikh Research Institute. He holds a BS in Aerospace Engineering from Wichita State University, an MS in Engineering Management from the University of Kansas, and an MPhil from Punjab University in the linguistics of the Guru Granth Sahib. 

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Masters’ Student, The University of British Columbia

Parveen Kaur is currently a Masters’ Student at The University of British Columbia in the Master of Data Science Program.

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