Partition

Partition

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Articles

Friday
,
20
May
2022

Jassa Singh Ahluwalia

Jassa Singh Ahluwalia (1718-1783) was one of the most outstanding leaders Sikhs have had. As a leader, he prepared the Sikh community to take control of its own destiny in the most troubled times and write a chapter on its own in the annals of history. His leadership helped the Sikh community through multiple genocidal campaigns and turned out sovereigns in Panjab, a North-Western region in South Asia.

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Monday
,
21
March
2022

Paigham-i-Goya: An Expression of Love

A new translation and brief essay on the fifty-second ghazal from Bhai Nand Lal’s Divan-i-Goya.‍

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Friday
,
11
March
2022

1947: The Sikhs & The Panjab

Sikh Research Institute (SikhRI) is pleased to announce the upcoming conference on the 1947 Partition on 1 October 2022. We invite submissions from scholars, writers, leaders, activists, creatives, and those who want to consider the intricate dynamics of nationalism pertaining to the Sikhs and the Panjab during the 1947 Partition.

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Tuesday
,
16
April
2019

What happened at Kartarpur Sahib?

I have a morning ritual: I drop my daughter to her school, turn on NPR (National Public Radio in America), and listen to it for about 7 minutes, return home, to make sure that my son catches his school bus. Several weeks ago, I caught the tail-end of coverage from “Kartarpur Crossing” around 8:26 am in New Jersey, USA. It was pretty good. It nuanced the politics of India and Pakistan, with Sikh affairs in the middle of it. But, like all global news coverages so far, it also missed the original impetus of Kartarpur Sahib. So, here it is!

READ More ⟶
Friday
,
11
March
2022

1947: The Sikhs & The Panjab

Sikh Research Institute (SikhRI) is pleased to announce the upcoming conference on the 1947 Partition on 1 October 2022. We invite submissions from scholars, writers, leaders, activists, creatives, and those who want to consider the intricate dynamics of nationalism pertaining to the Sikhs and the Panjab during the 1947 Partition.

READ More ⟶
Tuesday
,
16
April
2019

What happened at Kartarpur Sahib?

I have a morning ritual: I drop my daughter to her school, turn on NPR (National Public Radio in America), and listen to it for about 7 minutes, return home, to make sure that my son catches his school bus. Several weeks ago, I caught the tail-end of coverage from “Kartarpur Crossing” around 8:26 am in New Jersey, USA. It was pretty good. It nuanced the politics of India and Pakistan, with Sikh affairs in the middle of it. But, like all global news coverages so far, it also missed the original impetus of Kartarpur Sahib. So, here it is!

READ More ⟶

Podcasts

Friday
,
21
August
2020

The Sikhs and The Panjab

73 years ago, two nation-states were carved by the British mapmaking: Hindustan and Pakistan. The historical Sikh Homeland in The Panjab was divided by the Radcliffe line. In now truncated Indian Panjab, a proportion of the Sikhs led many campaigns to fight for economic, political, state, human, and religious rights. What’s next to secure the Sikh aspirations and the Panjab’s autonomy?

LISTEN NOW⟶
,

The Sikhs and The Panjab

73 years ago, two nation-states were carved by the British mapmaking: Hindustan and Pakistan. The historical Sikh Homeland in The Panjab was divided by the Radcliffe line. In now truncated Indian Panjab, a proportion of the Sikhs led many campaigns to fight for economic, political, state, human, and religious rights. What’s next to secure the Sikh aspirations and the Panjab’s autonomy?

LISTEN NOW⟶
Friday
,
21
August
2020

The Sikhs and The Panjab

73 years ago, two nation-states were carved by the British mapmaking: Hindustan and Pakistan. The historical Sikh Homeland in The Panjab was divided by the Radcliffe line. In now truncated Indian Panjab, a proportion of the Sikhs led many campaigns to fight for economic, political, state, human, and religious rights. What’s next to secure the Sikh aspirations and the Panjab’s autonomy?

LISTEN NOW⟶
,

The Sikhs and The Panjab

73 years ago, two nation-states were carved by the British mapmaking: Hindustan and Pakistan. The historical Sikh Homeland in The Panjab was divided by the Radcliffe line. In now truncated Indian Panjab, a proportion of the Sikhs led many campaigns to fight for economic, political, state, human, and religious rights. What’s next to secure the Sikh aspirations and the Panjab’s autonomy?

LISTEN NOW⟶
Friday
,
21
August
2020

The Sikhs and The Panjab

73 years ago, two nation-states were carved by the British mapmaking: Hindustan and Pakistan. The historical Sikh Homeland in The Panjab was divided by the Radcliffe line. In now truncated Indian Panjab, a proportion of the Sikhs led many campaigns to fight for economic, political, state, human, and religious rights. What’s next to secure the Sikh aspirations and the Panjab’s autonomy?

LISTEN NOW⟶
,

The Sikhs and The Panjab

73 years ago, two nation-states were carved by the British mapmaking: Hindustan and Pakistan. The historical Sikh Homeland in The Panjab was divided by the Radcliffe line. In now truncated Indian Panjab, a proportion of the Sikhs led many campaigns to fight for economic, political, state, human, and religious rights. What’s next to secure the Sikh aspirations and the Panjab’s autonomy?

LISTEN NOW⟶